Home » Artificial Intelligence » 5 Reads in AI & Robotics – The Rude Bot Rises

5 Reads in AI & Robotics – The Rude Bot Rises

Carer robot.png

 

The AI chatbot who learned via the Unabomber Manifesto!

Charles and his team actually created a chatbot called cobot. It was really simple, and it was really dumb. But the users wanted it to be smart, they wanted to talk to it. So Charles and his team had to come up with a quick and easy way to make cobot appear smarter than it actually was. So they showed the robot a bunch of texts (they started, weirdly, with the Unabomber manifesto) and trained it to simply pick a few words that you said to it, search for those words in the things it had read, and spit those sentences back at you.

The resulting conversations between users and cobot are…. very weird. (Rose Eveleth, Flash Forward) You may also want to listen to Rose’s episode Love and Sex With Robots)

 

A fallback plan for when 95% of human labor isn’t valued or needed due to automation 

Basic Income is not necessarily my ideal scenario, but Andrew gives a terrific overview of the pro’s and con’s in this excellent article. The 95% figure comes from Y Combinator Manager, Matt Krisiloff!

Silicon Valley techies hope a guaranteed income would cushion the blow as automation replaces human jobs. Those with a more utopian bent, such as the organizers of the Swiss referendum, want to open up more options, to let people create art and free the world of what Daniel Straub calls “bullshit jobs.” (Andrew Flowers at FiveThirtyEight)

 

Stanford’s robotic diver recovers treasures from King Louis XIV’s wrecked ship

OceanOne looks something like a robo-mermaid. Roughly five feet long from end to end, its torso features a head with stereoscopic vision that shows the pilot exactly what the robot sees, and two fully articulated arms… Every aspect of the robot’s design is meant to allow it to take on tasks that are either dangerous – deep-water mining, oil-rig maintenance or underwater disaster situations like the Fukushima Daiichi power plant – or simply beyond the physical limits of human divers. (Stanford News)

And just think Frey and Osborne said there is only an 18% probability commercial divers will lose their jobs to robots!

 

Progress in A.I. will affect society profoundly

The first wave of AI is already beginning to pervade our lives inconspicuously, from speech recognition and search engines to image classification. Self-driving cars and applications in health care are within sight, and subsequent waves could transform vast sectors of the economy, science and society. These could offer substantial benefits — but to whom? (Nature – Editorial)

 

In your old age what happens if your carer just happens to be a robot?

“There’s a pressing requirement for robots in the social care of the elderly, partly because we have fewer people of working age,” says Tony Belpaeme, a professor in intelligent and autonomous control systems at Plymouth University. Traditionally among the poorest paid of the workforce, carers are an ever more scarce resource.

Policy makers have begun to cast their eyes towards robots as a possible source of compliant and cheaper help. (Geoff Watts in The Atlantic)

 

What are you reading?

 

 

 

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1 Comment

  1. […] Editorial in Nature on preparing for the socio-economic and political consequences of artificial intelligence (pointer from Robotenomics) […]

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